[short story] What you’re implying (at best) backwards

Article 8. Of the fundamental axiom on which all of this rests

  • All Namuh beings are born unequal in abilities and needs, and should be treated as such. A variety of factors ranging from genetic to pure random circumstances places each and every one on different footing from the start of their lives.

Article 7. Of the necessity for different treatment

  • As such, it only makes sense for the law to take these specificities into account, and to differ in principle from one individual to the other. 
  • All Namuh beings are unequal before the law. They are entitled to different rights,  different degrees of freedom, and should respect different duties, depending on their predispositions and circumstances.

Article 6. Of the grouping of population into castes

  • One can distinguish several common traits in Namuh defining broad groups of population that share common needs and idiosyncrasies. These groups are thereafter named classes or castes.
  • The caste system is the unalienable indisputable foundation of the Namuh society legitimized by individual specificity.
  • Every Namuh is entitled to a Caste Assignment, no-one shall be deprived of his Assignment or the right to attempt to change it.
  • Changing caste requires the authorization of both castes. No-one shall be allowed to a new caste without proving undeniably that it is where they belong. This process shall be subject to strict control.
  • Until reasonably proven otherwise beyond doubt, Namuh children are assumed to be similar to their parent and environment, and are therefore of the same caste as their parents.

Article 5. Of the necessity for different rules for each caste

  • To ensure the optimal handling of each caste particularities, each caste shall have their own body of laws, freedoms, rights and obligations.
  • The laws of a caste may, but shall not necessarily, acknowledge, define and consider further subdivision of the local population and adapt their rights and freedoms accordingly.
  • In addition, castes may occasionally be further refined into smaller isolated components should they prove sufficiently distinct.

Article 4. Of the necessity for geographical localization of caste

  • In order to allow for proper application of caste law, and to best match each caste with a suitable environment, each caste shall be assigned to a fixed geographical area suiting their needs. They are referred to in the following as sectors, or camps.
  • Each caste is fully sovereign of their sector. No-one may intervene or interfere on another sector without their consent. The ruling power of the local caste is absolute. 
  • Laws and rights within the sector are entirely governed by the local caste, and may be widely different from one sector to the next.
  • The members of the caste are required total submission to the sector’s local law, and no other. They have no freedoms besides the ones specifically allowed by the sector law.
  • No-one may dictate the size of sectors. It is left to a decentralized process of competition between the sectors to adjust the sector’s sizes as seen fit depending on the variation of population size and needs.
  • Castes are to be strictly confined to their respective sectors. Freedom of movement between sectors might only be allowed on a case by case basis by ad hoc rules.

Article 3. Of the necessity for geographical boundaries

  • Each sector is delimited by strict boundaries, the crossing of which shall be regulated rigorously.
  • These boundaries shall be arbitrarily drawn and define clear territories for castes, though they may occasionally follow natural landmarks to facilitate demarcation.
  • No goods or population shall be exchanged between two sectors without careful considerations, so as to avoid unwanted interference between castes. Treaties and agreements may be considered to facilitate and regulate trade when appropriate.
  • Fences, walls and other separation apparatus may be considered. More lenient separation may be negotiated ad hoc on a case by case basis.
  • Sector boundaries shall be enforced by any means necessary, including but not limited to weapons and military means.

Article 2. Of the shared cultural and social history legitimizing sectors

  • This declaration shall be established as an unquestionable fundamental element of society, until every Namuh fully interiorizes their caste and sector and accepts the limits of their rights.
  • Alternatives should be negated out of the collective unconscious and shall be  inconceivable. In the end, Namuhs shall not notice much less doubt the dominion of the caste system. Its rule shall then be unopposed, and the Namuhs shall have no escape.
  • To that end, each sector may adopt their own customs and language to foster a sentiment of unity and belonging in the caste. Namuhs of a caste shall be conditioned to be emotionally attached to their caste and sector. Traditions, sports, culture, language and symbols are ideal vectors to reinforce the conditioning, until every Namuh is properly locked in their sector and caste physically, psychologically and emotionally.
  • It is expected that as time passes, the system established by this declaration shall gain strength through inertia until it becomes de facto absolute, as the sectors become invested in their identity and the separation between castes grows deeper.

Article 1. Of the acknowledgement of the reality of sectors

One thought on “[short story] What you’re implying (at best) backwards

  1. Pingback: Short stories index – UltimateRealFiction

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